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Cryosurgery for Athletes, Skiers & Dancers

Athletes, skiers and dancers have a high risk of developing Morton’s neuroma. For athletes in particular, cryosurgery is a popular treatment option – primarily because of the quicker recovery period it offers over conventional Morton’s neuroma surgery.

Cryosurgery for Sports People

Explosive ‘stop start’ multi-directional movement can cause sports people such as dancers and footballers to be especially prone to forefoot problems such as Morton’s Neuroma. The forces involved in such activities can cause a separate precipitating condition called synovitis or capsulitis of the metatarsal phalangeal joints in the forefoot. Synovitis is essentially a swelling of the joint’s outer lining.

The inflammation of the synovitis can impinge and chaff the inter-digital nerve as it passes by, ultimately causing a neuroma. Such sports people therefore require careful management because if the underlying biomechanical issue that caused the synovitisis not dealt with the neuroma can return after treatment.

One of the main benefits of cryosurgery for professional athletes is the dramatic reduction in downtime after treatment. Often, professionals can be back in training with little or no pain after just a few weeks.

Cryosurgery for Athletes at The Barn Clinic

At The Barn Clinic we have many years’ experience of dealing with acute sports injuries and conditions such as Morton’s Neuroma. We have treated international standard athletes including professional footballers, sprinters, middle and long distance runners, professional dancers, professional tennis and table tennis players and professional boxers to mention just a few. We are always happy to liaise with club doctors and physiotherapists, and where necessary provide detailed biomechanical assessment and neuroma specific sports friendly orthotics.

Below is a video testimonial from Tony Bennett, one of the UK’s most successful professional dance coaches, describing his experience of Cryosurgery for his Morton’s neuroma and his subsequent recovery and return to dancing – which causes more foot neuromas than any other activity.