Why does Morton’s Neuroma seem better during the Summer?

Why do so many people report that their neuroma feels so much better in the summer?


Could it be the sunshine and sangria effect? Where we are either, on holiday or have a holiday to look forward to, or we are super relaxed after a holiday. The sun is shining and psychologically we all feel so much better and our day-to-day problems seem just that little bit less bothersome, including our neuroma. Why should this be, is it all down to the sunshine? Well the sunshine could definitely help.

There is a lot of evidence now, that the sunshine vitamin, vitamin D has an important role to play in the body’s tissue repair and anti-inflammatory mechanisms and we know neuromas do have an inflammatory component to them. Maybe a boost of vitamin D levels, combined with a week or two of the famous Mediterranean diet, high in anti-inflammatory omega 3s, and low in inflammatory omega 6s could be just what the food doctor ordered, however, there is probably something much more simple and down to earth at play.  

For most, once a Morton’s neuroma has reared its ugly head there is a period of time where the symptoms can be managed with lifestyle changes, especially choice of footwear. For most, year by year the symptoms ebb and flow, they feel better in the summer and worse in the winter. This seasonal change is really down to the fact that summer footwear is so much flatter and wider and forgiving.  In a flat shoe, the forefoot region where neuromas form, takes approximately 30% of body weight, this is far more manageable than the 66% of body weight going through the forefoot in a shoe with a higher heel. Secondly sandals benefit from being wider in the toe-box making more room for you and your little foot fiend to get along with each other. 

For the record we don’t sell footwear or have shares in Birkenstocks, and with that said, this year the Birkenstocks Arizona 2019 is a really good choice if you suffer from neuroma, it ticks all the neuroma friendly boxes. It has an adjustable forefoot strap, a supportive cork foot-bed that will support your feet In all the right places. The cork foot-beds also mould around any lumps and bumps your feet might have, meaning the shoe adapts around you and not the other way around (for the friendly people at Birkenstocks reading this I take a size UK 10.5).

October and November are our busiest months, with a large influx of new patients. This is simply because a lot of people can no longer put up with the pain once the neuroma has been compressed again by their winter shoes. Our advice would be, choose your winter footwear very carefully and try and transition into a shoe that is as wide and as flat as possible.

Be kind to your neuroma, don’t go from one footwear extreme to another.